I’m an evangelist and a Trump voter. But Trump as the ‘second coming of God’ is blasphemous.

Since President Donald Trump’s election, many in the evangelical community have lauded him, grateful for his work to protect and propel some of the Christian values we hold so dear. The support has been unwavering, as he enjoys high marks from about 70 percent of evangelicals, many of whom are so concerned with protecting their rights and key issues that they don’t want to do anything that might jeopardize that support for Trump and cause people to vote against him.
But perhaps one of Trump’s most disturbing steps came Wednesday, when the president, who claims to be a Christian, tweeted quotes of and therefore validated radio host’s Wayne Allyn Root words that “the Jewish people love [Trump] . . . like he’s the King of Israel. They love him like he is the second coming of God.”
Christians believe and profess that the only true “King of Israel” is God, as clearly stated in Isaiah 44:6, and that he sent his son, Jesus Christ, the Messiah, into this world. That makes the description of Trump as “the second coming of God” shocking, blasphemous and sacrilegious.
The silence from my fellow evangelical colleagues, ministry partners and friends that has followed is deafening. Many of them refuse to call out moral failures on the right that they have so vehemently attacked on the left.
In the evangelical community, we have come to believe incorrectly that any critique of Trump only serves to promote the party on the left. But embracing critiques proves we are objective, not blind to the flaws in political parties or our presidents.
Trump is neither the “Second Coming of God” nor the “Messiah.” In repeating the profane quote, he gave a narcissistic endorsement and even thanked Root, a well-known conspiracy theorist, for his words.
Messianic claims are dangerous, because God…

0
0