Diver’s find in sunken wreckage of bomber could lead to recognition of WWII veteran’s valor

Even at 96, Armand Sedgeley recalls long-ago events with the clarity of the raw, 22-year-old Army airman he was on the day he fell from the sky over Italy. Sedgeley, who lives in a Lakewood retirement community, never sought recognition for his actions during World War II, when the B-17 “Flying Fortress,” on which he served as bombardier, succumbed to enemy attack. But now — 74 years later — he finds himself awaiting word on whether he will receive a Silver Star, the third-highest medal for valor in combat. “It definitely would be meaningful,” Sedgeley said, noting that his four sons, three grandchildren and one great-grandchild would look with pride on the honor. It also would have meant a lot to his wife, Anne, who died in February. If the award comes through, it would be the result of an unlikely chain of events that sparked a stranger’s decades-long advocacy. A discovery by a marine biologist in the Mediterranean Sea off the island of Corsica, where Sedgeley’s B-17 bomber had to

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