Citizens defy Border Patrol by staying silent with video cameras

Protest against Border Patrol utilizes internet videos to spread awareness No drugs or would-be immigrants were hidden in the sedan that rolled up to a Border Patrol checkpoint on a Southern California highway last week, but within 90 seconds the driver was handcuffed. Some of the travelers appear to be making a stand for what they say are their rights and contend that the government, which has long drawn support for doing whatever is needed to protect the nation’s borders, is going too far. The Navy veteran had his window smashed out by agents who yanked him from the cab and took him away, also while a camera rolled. The videos fall into the genre of recording police but offer viewers a ride with citizens who haven’t left this country and don’t see why they should have to tell federal agents about their comings and goings. The patrol, along with its parent agency, Customs and Border Protection, declined to say how many people who fail to comply at these checkpoints are detained. “Border Patrol agents may lawfully question the (vehicle) occupants about their citizenship and place of birth, and may request documented proof of immigration status and how an individual status was obtained,” CBP said in a prepared statement. The agency also said that checkpoints do not give agents the automatic authority to search people or their vehicles but that they may consent to searches. […] he also refused to move his vehicle from a primary traffic lane into a secondary inspection area and later struggled as agents pulled him out and put him in a cell, according to court papers. James Lyall, of the American Civil Liberties Union, said he, too, has seen a movement of people challenging checkpoints and added that the Border Patrol can’t legally pull motorists from cars just because they won’t answer questions.

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